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Jerika Norona, a third year Clinical student, receives the American Psychological Association (APA) Early Graduate Student Researcher Award

Jerika Norona, a third year Clinical student, receives the American Psychological Association (APA) Early Graduate Student Researcher Award

Congrats to Jerika Norona, a third year Clinical student, for receiving the American Psychological Association (APA) Early Graduate Student Researcher Award.  More than 100 graduate students applied for the national award.  Jerika was one of three recipients.  Applicants represented all areas of research within psychological science and recipients were selected based on the quality of their research during their initial years of graduate study.  The APA Science Student Council established the Early Graduate Student Researcher Award in 2004 to recognize students who have demonstrated outstanding research ability early in their graduate careers. Recipients receive an award of $1,000.

Norona's research broadly focuses on romantic experiences and identity development during adolescence and emerging adulthood. Her previous research has explored the development and dissolution of romantic relationships, including couple conflict, rejection and betrayal, and how they are related to salient psychosocial tasks across developmental stages. Currently, Jerika is continuing the exploration of the "darker" sides of romantic experiences by examining the developmental significance of breakups and infidelity in emerging adulthood.

Norona is a third-year graduate student in the clinical psychology doctoral program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and works under the mentorship of Deborah Welsh, PhD, and Kristi Gordon, PhD. Additionally, she conducts individual, couple and family therapy at Cornerstone of Recovery, an inpatient residential facility for chemical dependence, as well as at the University of Tennessee Psychological Clinic. In response to receiving this award, Norona said, "I feel very honored to be a recipient of this award. I am deeply grateful to my research mentors and colleagues for helping me develop and foster my curiosity about romantic experiences and how they help us develop as individuals and as romantic partners.

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