Skip to content

Faculty

Jioni A. Lewis

Jioni A. LewisJioni A. Lewis
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (2013)

Office Location
416E Austin Peay Building
Knoxville, TN 37996
Phone: (865) 974-3579
Email: jalewis@utk.edu

Key words: Race and racism, gender and sexism, gendered racism, intersectionality theory, Black women’s health


Research Interests

Dr. Lewis’s research is broadly focused on the influence of discrimination on mental and physical health outcomes. Specifically, she explores intersecting forms of oppression, racism, sexism, intersectionality, racial and gender identity, stress and coping, and Black women’s health.

Research statement

Dr. Lewis’s program of research is focused on the influence of discrimination on mental and physical health outcomes. Her research explores two interrelated areas: (1) the intersection of racism and sexism experienced by women of color and (2) the influence of subtle forms of racism experienced by racially diverse college students. Her primary area of research applies intersectionality theory to investigate the influence of racism and sexism on women of color. Within this line of research, Dr. Lewis developed the Gendered Racial Microaggressions Scale (Lewis & Neville, 2015), which is a self-report instrument to measure subtle gendered racism. In addition, she investigates the influence of gendered racism on mental health (depression, anxiety, traumatic stress) and physical health (self-reported physical health, salivary cortisol) for African American women. She also examines resiliency/protective factors that buffer individuals against the negative effects of gendered racism, such as coping strategies, racial identity, gender identity, etc.

Dr. Lewis’s secondary area of research is focused on subtle forms of racism experienced by people of color. Within this line of research, she utilizes qualitative and quantitative research methods to investigate the influence of subtle racism on the mental health and well-being of racially diverse college students.

Current and Future Research Directions

Dr. Lewis’s current ongoing research projects include exploring the link between gendered racism, mental health, and physiological indicators of chronic stress, such as salivary cortisol. In another collaborative research project, she is conducting a longitudinal mixed methods study on the racial experiences of students of color. Her future research will focus on reducing racial health disparities by developing preventative interventions to help people of color protect themselves against the negative health effects of racism.

Dr. Lewis co-founded the Critical Race Collective Community of Scholars at the University of Tennessee, an interdisciplinary community of scholars who use critical race theory in their research, teaching, and service. She also serves on the Chancellor’s Council on Diversity and Interculturalism, which is focused on the recruitment and retention of underrepresented faculty, staff, and students. She is also incoming President (2020 – 2022) of the Society for the Psychology of Women (APA Division 35), Section 1 (Psychology of Black Women).

Note: If you are interested in using the Gendered Racial Microaggressions Scale for your research, please email Dr. Lewis to request permission to use the scale.

Honors and Awards

  • Emerging Professional Contributions to Research Award, American Psychological Association, Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race (Div. 45) (2019)
  • Rising Star Early Career Award, National Multicultural Conference and Summit, American Psychological Association (2019)
  • Diversity Leadership Award, College of Arts & Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (2018)
  • Charles and Shirley Thomas Mentoring Award, American Psychological Association, Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race (Div. 45) (2018)
  • Institute for Academic Feminist Psychologists Scholar, American Psychological Association, Society for the Psychology of Women (Div. 35) (2018)
  • Interdepartmental Collaborative Research Award, College of Arts & Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (2017)
  • Woman to Woman in Education Award, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., Nu Zeta Chapter (2017)
  • Outstanding Contribution to Scholarship on Race and Ethnicity Award, American Psychological Association, Society of Counseling Psychology (Div. 17) (2016)
  • Women of Color Psychologies Research Award, Association for Women in Psychology (2016)
  • Junior Faculty Excellence in Teaching Award, College of Arts & Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (2015)
  • Carolyn Payton Early Career Professional Award, American Psychological Association, Society of the Psychology of Women (Div. 35), (2015)
  • Faculty Graduate Education Award, Department of Psychology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (2015)
  • Janet Hyde Graduate Student Research Grant, American Psychological Association, Society for the Psychology of Women (Div. 35) (2012)
  • Section on Ethnic and Racial Diversity Student Award, American Psychological Association, Society of Counseling Psychology (Div. 17), (2011)
  • Psychology Summer Institute Fellow, American Psychological Association, Minority Fellowship Program (2011)                                           
  • Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship Honorable Mention (2011)
  • William Chandler Bagley Doctoral Scholarship, University of Illinois (2011)   
  • Conference Student Scholarship, Teachers College Winter Roundtable on Cultural Psychology and Education (2010)
  • Conference Student Scholarship, American Psychological Association, Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race (Div. 45) (2010)
  • University of Illinois List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by Their Students,     (2008 – 2012)
  • President’s First Place Award for Outstanding Student Poster in Experimental Research on Ethnic Minority Issues, American Psychological Association (Div. 45) (2007)
  • Graduate College Fellowship, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2006)
  • Summer Pre-Doctoral Institute Fellowship, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2006)
  • Sally Casanova Pre-doctoral Fellowship, California State University System (2005)
  • Graduate Equity Fellowship, California State University, Sacramento (2005)
  • Sacramento Valley Psychological Association Scholarship Award (2005)

External

  • National Science Foundation, ADVANCE Grant. Role: Co-I (PI: Dr. Veerle Keppens, University of Tennessee, Knoxville); $713,763 (2018 – 2021)
  • Cultural Competency Grant, Knox County Schools. Role: Co-I (PI: Dr. Chonika Coleman-King, University of Tennessee, Knoxville); $950,398 (2018 – 2022)
  • American Psychological Foundation, Division 17 Counseling Psychology Grant. Role: PI; $1,000 (2017)
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH), Health Disparities Loan Repayment Program (LRP) Grant; $70,000 (2014 – 2016)

Internal

  • Chancellor’s Grant for Faculty Research, Office of Research and Engagement, University of Tennessee; $6,000 (2019)
  • Faculty/Student Research Grant, The Graduate School, University of Tennessee. Role: PI (Co-I: Erica J. Peppers); $4,671 (2017)
  • Creative Teaching Grant, University of Tennessee, Knoxville; $3,500 (2015)
  • University of Illinois College of Education Conference Travel Grant; $700 (2013)
  • University of Illinois College of Education Hardie Dissertation Grant; $2,000 (2011)        
  • University of Illinois Survey Research Robert Ferber Dissertation Grant; $1,000 (2011)
  • University of Illinois College of Education Hardie Conference Travel Grant; $1,000 (2011)
  • University of Illinois President's Research in Diversity Travel Grant; $500 (2011)
  • University of Illinois College Research Committee Travel Support Grant; $1,000 (2010)
  • University of Illinois Center on Democracy in a Multiracial Society Research Fellowship; $6,000 (2009)

*Denotes student collaborator
Lewis, J. A., Cameron, R. P., Kim-Ju, G., & Meyers, L. S. (in press). Examining the relations between racial identity and coping with race-related stress among African American, Asian American, and Latinx college students. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development.

Lewis, J. A., Mendenhall, R., *Ojiemwen, A., *Thomas, M., *Riopelle, C., Harwood, S., & Browne Huntt, M. (2019). Racial microaggressions and sense of belonging at a historically White university. American Behavioral Scientist. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764219859613

French, B. H., Lewis, J. A., Mosley, D., Adames, H. Y., Chavez-Dueñas, N. Y., Chen, G. A. & Neville, H. A. (2019). Toward a psychological framework of radical healing in communities of color. The Counseling Psychologist. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000019843506

Watson, L., Lewis, J. A., & *Moody, A. T. (2019). A sociocultural examination of Black women and body image. Body Image. Advance online. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bodyim.2019.03.008

*Williams, M., G. & Lewis, J. A. (2019). Gendered racial microaggressions and depressive symptoms among Black women: A moderated mediation model. Psychology of Women Quarterly. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/0361684319832511

*Moody, A., & Lewis, J. A. (2019). Gendered racial microaggressions and traumatic stress symptoms among Black women. Psychology of Women Quarterly. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/0361684319828288

Lewis, J. A. *Williams, M. G., *Moody, A. T., *Peppers, E. P., & *Gadson, C. A. (2018). Intersectionality theory and microaggressions: Implications for research, teaching, and practice. In C. M. Capodilupo, K. L. Nadal, D. P. Rivera, D. W. Sue, & G. C. Torino (Eds.), Microaggression Theory: Influence and Implications (pp. 48-64). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

Lewis, J. A. (2018). From modern sexism to gender microaggressions: Understanding contemporary forms of sexism and the impact on diverse women. In C. Travis & J. White (Eds.), APA Handbook of the Psychology of Women: Vol 1 (pp. 381-397). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Lewis, J. A., Raque-Bogdan, T. L., Lee, S., & Rao, M. A. (2018).Examining the influence of ethnic identity and meaning in life on career decision-making self-efficacy. Journal of Career Development, 45(1), 68-82.doi: 10.1177/0894845317696803

Lewis, J. A., *Williams, M. G., *Peppers, E., & *Gadson, C. A. (2017). Applying intersectionality to explore the relations between gendered racism and health among Black women. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 64(5), 475-486. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cou0000231

*Choi, S., Lewis, J. A., Harwood, S. A., Mendenhall, R., & Browne-Huntt, M. (2017). Is ethnic identity a buffer? Exploring the relations between racial microaggressions and depressive symptoms among Asian American individuals. Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work, 26(1-2), 18-29. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15313204.2016.1263815

Lewis, J. A., Mendenhall, R., Harwood, S., & Browne-Huntt, M. (2016). “Ain’t I a Woman?” Exploring gendered racial microaggressions experienced by Black women. The Counseling Psychologist, 44(5), 758–780. doi: 10.1177/0011000016641193

Szymanski, D. M. & Lewis, J. A. (2016). Gendered racism, coping, identity centrality, and African American college women’s psychological distress. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 40(2), 229-243. doi: 10.1177/0361684315616113

Lewis, J. A. & Grzanka, P. R. (2016). Applying intersectionality theory to research on perceived racism.  In A. N. Alvarez, C. T. H. Liang, & H. A. Neville (Eds.), The Cost of Racism for People of Color: Contextualizing Experiences of Discrimination. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Lewis, J. A. & Neville, H. A. (2015). Construction and initial validation of the gendered racial microaggressions scale for Black women. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 62(2), 289-302.doi:10.1037/cou0000062

Szymanski, D. M. & Lewis, J. A. (2015). Race-related stress and racial identity as predictors of African American activism. Journal of Black Psychology, 41(2), 170-191. doi:10.1177/0095798414520707

Neville, H. A., Poteat, V. P., Lewis, J. A., & Spanierman, L. B. (2014). Changes in White college students’ color-blind racial ideology over four years: Do diversity experiences make a difference? Journal of Counseling Psychology, 61(2), 179-190. doi:10.1037/a0035168

Lewis, J. A., Mendenhall, R., Harwood, S. A., & Browne Huntt, M. (2013). Coping with gendered racial microaggressions among Black women college students. Journal of African American Studies, 17(1), 51–73.doi:10.1007/s12111-012-9219-0

French, B. H., Lewis, J. A., & Neville, H. A. (2013). Naming and reclaiming: An interdisciplinary analysis of Black girls’ and women’s resistance strategies. Journal of African American Studies, 17(1), 1–6. doi:10.1007/s12111-012-9215-4

Lewis, J. A., Neville, H. A., & Spanierman, L.B. (2012). Examining the influence of campus diversity experiences and color-blind racial ideology on students’ social justice attitudes. Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, 49(2), 119–136. doi:10.1515/jsarp-2012-6291

Harwood, S. A., Browne Huntt, M., Mendenhall, R., & Lewis, J. A. (2012). Racial microaggressions in the residence halls: Experiences of students of color at a predominantly White university. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 5(3), 159–173. doi:10.1037/a0028956

Neville, H. A., Spanierman, L. B., & Lewis, J. A. (2012). The expanded psychosocial model of racism:  A new model for understanding and disrupting racism and white privilege. In N. A. Fouad, J. A. Carter, & L. M. Subich (Eds.), APA Handbook of Counseling Psychology: Vol. 2 Practice, Interventions, and Applications (pp. 333-360). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

The flagship campus of the University of Tennessee System and partner in the Tennessee Transfer Pathway.